Witnessing the rescinding of DACA through the eyes of 17-year-old immigrant

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By Charles Cole

I supported my Energy Convertors Fellow with this entry. He is a 17-year-old high school student from Oakland, named Edrees. This is what the rescinding of DACA looks like from his perspective. Help us stand for students like Edrees. 

On Tuesday, September 5, 2017, the Trump administration, abrogated the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). Consequently, our economy and communities will suffer. Our economy could lose $460 billion in the next decade, and 800,000 young undocumented immigrants could be deported. These are people who may develop the next life-changing idea for our society. We are human beings yet labeled as “illegal,” and who were allowed by the DACA to work legally, however, will now be forced back to a country they may not even remember or know. Trump will send many to a society flooded with poverty and death. Not only do they work hard and pay taxes like everyone else, but they also provide for their families and strengthen our communities. Although the United States is confronting over-population, this tactic majorly functions as a dehumanizing mechanism and the rending of innocent families. Therefore, the United States must deploy a more humane method that maintains natural law along with the promise of equity and liberty.

As a foreign-born citizen, I am devastated with this decision. I was born in Yemen, Sanaa, so I realize how scary it is to return to a country that has nothing but chaos and instability waiting for you. Not only are there little to no legitimate schools like the United States, but their technology and infrastructure are also years behind. My life would be significantly changed for the worst if I were forced to return there because it has an environment where dreams are thrown out the window by constant war and an unstable economy. 

Here, I have passionate goals and inspirations in my life. I will also bring pride to my family by being the first to attend and complete college. However, the abrogation of the DACA stands as a huge obstacle to my family and me as it has the power to break us up potentially. Aside from the fact that I can not live up to my real potential there, all the individuals that Trump wants to deport and I must brave the risk of actually being killed even if my family lives in a considerably safe area. War and chaos are prevalent in many foreign countries, particularly in the middle east at the moment. 

And although this may not be the case for everyone, corruption and violence are what I face in the wake of rescinding DACA, and this is the reality for hundreds of thousands of Dreamers.

Many Dreamers come from countries that have had their governments overthrown by terrorist and corrupt organizations. And although this may not be the case for everyone, corruption and violence are what I face in the wake of rescinding DACA, and this is the reality for hundreds of thousands of Dreamers.